Kelvin King speaks to why he’s running for U.S. Senate

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ELLIJAY, Ga – Businessman and self-starter Kelvin King took issue with those who called his candidacy for U.S. Senate a Republican strategy.

“I’m not a strategy. I’ve been a Republican for a long time, and I saw an opportunity. I saw a need in our Party to win back this sear and I think I can do it.” King remarked, “I’m not a tool of the Republican Party. No one in the Republican Party said ‘Hey Kelvin, I think you can win because your Black. I think that’s offensive. ”

He does believe he’s the best chance for Republican voters to take back a Senate seat in 2022. Senator Raphael Warnock (D) is up for reelection after winning the January runoff against Kelly Loeffler. Traditionally, Senators serve six years, but the race was for the remaining time in retired Senator Johnny Isakson’s term.

King considers himself a statesman who’s ready to represent Georgia in Washington D.C. if given the opportunity.

King’s a Georgia native who was born in Macon and grew up in Cobb County. He received an appointment to the Air Force Academy and served in the Air Force. Upon returning to Georgia, he began his own construction company out of his home, and now it’s a multimillion-dollar company.

He admitted he didn’t follow politics growing up but tended to vote Democrat until college when he began reading a lot of black history books and other materials. His first Republican vote was for George Bush. Self determination and less government are two ideas that King strongly believes in.

“As long as we have freedom and liberty that means we have the opportunity to succeed or fail on our own,” he stated.

As for cancel culture, King commented that it ultimately hurts innocent bystanders – those not directly involved. He cited MLB’s decision to move the All-Star Game from Cobb County. It resulted in millions lost for local businesses. King added that companies and media need to gather more accurate information before making final decisions. Cancel culture doesn’t unite America; it divides the country on a personal level.

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